Last updated: 8/31/2010
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Science - Chemistry - 20 Weeks

Unit IV- Periodic Table Pearson - Chemistry

    Chapter 6
(11) MST4.C.C.PS3.1 Students explain the properties of materials in terms of the arrangement and properties of the atoms that compose them.
3.1y The placement or location of elements on the Periodic Table gives an indication of physical and chemical properties of that element. The elements on the Periodic Table are arranged in order of increasing atomic number.

Demonstration: Reactivity of elements on periodic table.

Lab: The Periodic Law

Lab: The Alkaline Earth Metals
Math – Determining the # of neutrons in a given element using problem solving skills.
(11) MST4.C.C.PS3.1 Students explain the properties of materials in terms of the arrangement and properties of the atoms that compose them.
3.1g The number of protons in an atom (atomic number) identifies the element. The sum of the protons and neutrons in an atom (mass number) identifies an isotope. Common notations that represent isotopes include: 14C, 146C, carbon-14, C-14.
(11) MST4.C.C.PS3.1 Students explain the properties of materials in terms of the arrangement and properties of the atoms that compose them.
3.1v Elements can be classified by their properties and located on the Periodic Table as metals, nonmetals, metalloids (B, Si, Ge, As, Sb, Te), and noble gases.
(11) MST4.C.C.PS3.1 Students explain the properties of materials in terms of the arrangement and properties of the atoms that compose them.
3.1w Elements can be differentiated by their physical properties. Physical properties of substances, such as density, conductivity, malleability, solubility, and hardness, differ among elements.
(11) MST4.C.C.PS3.1 Students explain the properties of materials in terms of the arrangement and properties of the atoms that compose them.
3.1x Elements can be differentiated by chemical properties. Chemical properties describe how an element behaves during a chemical reaction. Video: The Periodic Table

Group 2 Metals Lab.doc
(11) MST4.C.C.PS3.1 Students explain the properties of materials in terms of the arrangement and properties of the atoms that compose them.
3.1z For Groups 1, 2, and 13-18 on the Periodic Table, elements within the same group have the same number of valence electrons (helium is an exception) and therefore similar chemical properties.
(11) MST4.C.C.PS3.1 Students explain the properties of materials in terms of the arrangement and properties of the atoms that compose them.
3.1aa The succession of elements within the same group demonstrates characteristic trends: differences in atomic radius, ionic radius, electronegativity, first ionization energy, metallic/nonmetallic properties.
(11) MST4.C.C.PS3.1 Students explain the properties of materials in terms of the arrangement and properties of the atoms that compose them.
3.1bb The succession of elements across the same period demonstrates characteristic trends: differences in atomic radius, ionic radius, electronegativity, first ionization energy, metallic/nonmetallic properties.
(17) MST4.C.C.PS5.2 Students explain chemical bonding in terms of the behavior of electrons.
5.2f Some elements exist in two or more forms in the same phase. These forms differ in their molecular or crystal structure, and hence in their properties.
(17) MST4.C.C.PS5.2 Students explain chemical bonding in terms of the behavior of electrons.
5.2c When an atom gains one or more electrons, it becomes a negative ion and its radius increases. When an atom loses one or more electrons, it becomes a positive ion and its radius decreases.
(17) MST4.C.C.PS5.2 Students explain chemical bonding in terms of the behavior of electrons.
5.2j Electronegativity indicates how strongly an atom of an element attracts electrons in a chemical bond. Electronegativity values are assigned according to arbitrary scales.
Unit V- Formulas & Equations Pearson - Chemistry

    Chapters 9
(11) MST4.C.C.PS3.1 Students explain the properties of materials in terms of the arrangement and properties of the atoms that compose them.
3.1cc A compound is a substance composed of two or more different elements that are chemically combined in a fixed proportion. A chemical compound can be broken down by chemical means. A chemical compound can be represented by a specific chemical formula and assigned a name based on the IUPAC system. Internet Activity: Balancing Equations Math – Problem solving
(11) MST4.C.C.PS3.1 Students explain the properties of materials in terms of the arrangement and properties of the atoms that compose them.
3.1dd Compounds can be differentiated by their chemical and physical properties.
(11) MST4.C.C.PS3.1 Students explain the properties of materials in terms of the arrangement and properties of the atoms that compose them.
3.1ee Types of chemical formulas include empirical, molecular, and structural.
(3) MST4.C.C.PS3.3 Students apply the principle of conservation of mass to chemical reactions.
3.3d The empirical formula of a compound is the simplest whole-number ratio of atoms of the elements in a compound. It may be different from the molecular formula, which is the actual ratio of atoms in a molecule of that compound.
(3) MST4.C.C.PS3.3 Students apply the principle of conservation of mass to chemical reactions.
3.3a In all chemical reactions there is a conservation of mass, energy, and charge.
(3) MST4.C.C.PS3.3 Students apply the principle of conservation of mass to chemical reactions.
3.3c A balanced chemical equation represents conservation of atoms. The coefficients in a balanced chemical equation can be used to determine mole ratios in the reaction. Airbag Investigation.doc
(1) MST4.C.C.PS3.2 Students use atomic and molecular models to explain common chemical reactions.
3.2b Types of chemical reactions include synthesis, decomposition, single replacement, and double replacement.
(17) MST4.C.C.PS5.2 Students explain chemical bonding in terms of the behavior of electrons.
5.2h Metals tend to react with nonmetals to form ionic compounds. Nonmetals tend to react with other nonmetals to form molecular (covalent) compounds. Ionic compounds containing polyatomic ions have both ionic and covalent bonding.
Unit VI- Bonding and Forces of Attraction Pearson - Chemistry

Chapters 7 & 8
(17) MST4.C.C.PS5.2 Students explain chemical bonding in terms of the behavior of electrons.
5.2g Two major categories of compounds are ionic and molecular (covalent) compounds. Global Studies – World War I and World War II – atomic bomb
(17) MST4.C.C.PS5.2 Students explain chemical bonding in terms of the behavior of electrons.

5.2a Chemical bonds are formed when valence electrons are:

  •  transferred from one atom to another (ionic)
  •  shared between atoms (covalent)
  •  mobile within a metal (metallic)
Identify types of chemical bonds in a given formula

INQUIRY BASED CONDUCTIVITY LAB.doc
(17) MST4.C.C.PS5.2 Students explain chemical bonding in terms of the behavior of electrons.
5.2e In a multiple covalent bond, more than one pair of electrons are shared between two atoms.

Lab: Three-Dimensional Models of Covalent Molecules

Lab: Shapes of Molecules
(17) MST4.C.C.PS5.2 Students explain chemical bonding in terms of the behavior of electrons.
5.2l Molecular polarity can be determined by the shape of the molecule and the distribution of charge. Symmetrical (nonpolar) molecules include CO2, CH4, and diatomic elements (H2, N2, O2, F2, Cl2, Br2, I2). Asymmetrical (polar) molecules include HCl, NH3, and H2O. See above
(17) MST4.C.C.PS5.2 Students explain chemical bonding in terms of the behavior of electrons.
5.2c When an atom gains one or more electrons, it becomes a negative ion and its radius increases. When an atom loses one or more electrons, it becomes a positive ion and its radius decreases.
(17) MST4.C.C.PS5.2 Students explain chemical bonding in terms of the behavior of electrons.
5.2i When a bond is broken, energy is absorbed. When a bond is formed, energy is released.
(17) MST4.C.C.PS5.2 Students explain chemical bonding in terms of the behavior of electrons.
5.2b Atoms attain a stable valence electron configuration by bonding with other atoms. Noble gases have stable valence configurations and tend not to bond.
(17) MST4.C.C.PS5.2 Students explain chemical bonding in terms of the behavior of electrons.
5.2n Physical properties of substances can be explained in terms of chemical bonds and intermolecular forces. These properties include conductivity, malleability, solubility, hardness, melting point, and boiling point. Activity: Applying Scientific Methods
(17) MST4.C.C.PS5.2 Students explain chemical bonding in terms of the behavior of electrons.
5.2d Electron-dot diagrams (Lewis structures) can represent the valence electron arrangement in elements, compounds, and ions. Construct Lewis Dot Diagrams
(17) MST4.C.C.PS5.2 Students explain chemical bonding in terms of the behavior of electrons.
5.2j Electronegativity indicates how strongly an atom of an element attracts electrons in a chemical bond. Electronegativity values are assigned according to arbitrary scales.
(17) MST4.C.C.PS5.2 Students explain chemical bonding in terms of the behavior of electrons.
5.2m Intermolecular forces created by the unequal distribution of charge result in varying degrees of attraction between molecules. Hydrogen bonding is an example of a strong intermolecular force.
(17) MST4.C.C.PS5.2 Students explain chemical bonding in terms of the behavior of electrons.
5.2k The electronegativity difference between two bonded atoms is used to assess the degree of polarity in the bond.
(17) MST4.C.C.PS5.2 Students explain chemical bonding in terms of the behavior of electrons.
5.2h Metals tend to react with nonmetals to form ionic compounds. Nonmetals tend to react with other nonmetals to form molecular (covalent) compounds. Ionic compounds containing polyatomic ions have both ionic and covalent bonding.

Chemistry Item Analysis _2010_.pdf

Sample Literacy Strategy for Scientific Reading Pa

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