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Lesson Plan

Combining Syllables to Form 2- and 3-Syllable Words by ECSDM


Subject

English Language Arts (2005)


Objectives

Students will be able to:

  • Read closed and silent "e" syllables.
  • Construct 2-syllable words.
  • Arrange closed and silent "e" syllables to form 3 and 4 syllable words
    • Determine which syllable should begin or end the word.
    • Predict the order of syllables, revising when necessary.

Materials

SMART Board, laptop computer, projector, dictionary
If unable to use a SMART Board, you will need a copy of the file printed on transparencies, overhead projector, white board, dry erase markers, and/or paper.

Description

This lesson requires that students already know short vowel sounds. They should also be able to read CVC (consonant-vowel-consonant) words, as well as one syllable words with a silent "e."

In this lesson, students will use CVC syllables and CVCe syllables to form 2-syllable words. Then they will rearrange CVC and CVCe syllables to form 3-syllable words.

Target Audience:
This lesson is for high school students with learning disables who are decoding at less than a fifth grade level. Although the skills of reading short vowel and silent "e" syllables are low elementary level, the vocabulary selected for this lesson is at a higher level.

Procedure

  • This lesson is best done on a SMART Board. Project the SMART Notebook file "Closed, Silent E Match " onto the SMART Board.
  • Use the screen shade to reveal the first syllable in each column ("mis" "sane"). (The screen shade is a tool of the SMART Board that allows only a section of the page to be shown at one time.)
    Ask a student to read the closed syllable ("mis"), checking for correct pronunciation of the short vowel and consonants. Then ask another student to read the silent "e" syllable ("sane"), again always checking for correct pronunciation. Have a third student put these two syllables together ("missane") and ask them if this makes a word that they have heard.
    If they say it does, ask them to use the word in a sentence. If they use the word incorrectly, ask them to find the word in a dictionary. Continue in this fashion until the entire first section is revealed.
  • Now have the students look at both columns and tell them to take one syllable from the closed syllable column and match it with a silent "e" syllable. On the SMART Board, they can physically move the syllables to form 2-syllable words. (On paper, they can draw a line to form the new words.)
  • Ask the students to use the word they have formed in a sentence. This will help the teacher assess how well the students' know the meaning of the words. Continue with the next section and onto page two. Notice that the syllables become more difficult because some of them include consonant blends and digraphs.
  • Pages three and four of the "Closed, Silent E Match " have the students unscrambling syllables to form three syllable words.
  • Using the screen shade tool on the SMART Board, expose the first section. Ask the students to read each of the syllables.
  • Then ask them which syllable they think is at the end of the word. They should be able to recognize that the syllable with the suffix, such as" -ing," or the syllable with the silent "e" is at the end. If there is no clue for the end of the word, ask students to predict which syllable would be at the beginning of the word, using prefixes or capital letters as a clue.
  • Have the student physically rearrange the syllables until they form the word (subtracting).
  • The students will need to predict the order of syllables, based on previous knowledge of the structure of words. They will then choose an order and justify their decision by using the word in a sentence or finding it in a dictionary.
  • Continue in this fashion until all words are unscrambled.
  • Closed, Silent E Match.xbk
  • Closed, Silent E Match.pdf
  • Assessment

    Assessment of the students' ability to read short vowel and silent "e" syllables will be ongoing during this lesson.

    If a more formal assessment is needed, the teacher can print out the pages of this lesson and give them to the students to do on their own. In the SMART Board file, the teacher can change the order of syllables in each section and print a copy of this revision to be used as an assessment.

    Target Audience

    This lesson is for high school students with learning disables who are decoding at less than a fifth grade level. Although the skills of reading short vowel and silent "e" syllables are low elementary level, the vocabulary selected for this lesson is at a higher level.

    Teacher notes

    This lesson should be done on a SMART Board so that the students can physically move the syllables and rearrange them to form the new words.

    If a SMART Board is not available then the "Closed, Silent E Match" PDF file can be downloaded and printed. (If done on transparencies and projected onto a white board, a piece of paper can serve the same purpose as the screen shade and students can draw lines to match the syllables.)

    You may notice that a few of the syllables in the unscramble part of the lesson are not true closed syllables (CVC). They do have a short vowel sound and the word has been divided this way according to the "Starting Over" syllabication patterns.

    This activity can easily be adapted to be a competition between 2-3 small teams.

    SMART Board

    This instructional content was intended for use with a SMART Board. The .xbk file above can only be opened with SMART Notebook software. To download this free software from the SMART Technologies website, please click here.

  • Closed, Silent E Match.xbk
  • Duration

    1 class period, 40 minutes


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