Last updated: 5/18/2015

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English-Regents Prep-11/12-Unit 3-Synthesis

Duration/Time Frame:

1 Marking Period

(1) L.11-12.1 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
(1) RH.11-12.1 Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole.
(1) RH.11-12.2 Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideas.
(1) RH.11-12.5 Analyze in detail how a complex primary source is structured, including how key sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text contribute to the whole.
(1) RH.11-12.6 Evaluate authors' differing points of view on the same historical event or issue by assessing the authors' claims, reasoning, and evidence.
(1) RH.11-12.7 Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, as well as in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem.
(1) RH.11-12.8 Evaluate an author's premises, claims, and evidence by corroborating or challenging them with other information.
(1) RI.11-12.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
(1) RI.11-12.10 By the end of grade 11, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 11-CCR text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. By the end of grade 12, read and comprehend literary nonfiction at the high end of the grades 11-CCR text complexity band independently and proficiently.
(1) RI.11-12.7 Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words in order to address a question or solve a problem.
(1) RI.11-12.8 Delineate and evaluate the reasoning in seminal U.S. texts, including the application of constitutional principles and use of legal reasoning (e.g., in U.S. Supreme Court majority opinions and dissents) and the premises, purposes, and arguments in works of public advocacy (e.g., The Federalist, presidential addresses).
(1) RI.11-12.9 Analyze seventeenth-, eighteenth-, and nineteenth-century foundational U.S. documents of historical and literary significance (including The Declaration of Independence, the Preamble to the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address) for their themes, purposes, and rhetorical features.
(1) RL.11-12.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
(1) RL.11-12.11.a Self-select text to respond and develop innovative perspectives.
(1) RL.11-12.11.b Establish and use criteria to classify, select, and evaluate texts to make informed judgments about the quality of the pieces.
(1) RST.11-12.9 Synthesize information from a range of sources (e.g., texts, experiments, simulations) into a coherent understanding of a process, phenomenon, or concept, resolving conflicting information when possible.
(1) SL.11-12.1.a Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well reasoned exchange of ideas.
(1) SL.11-12.5 Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.
(1) W.11-12.1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
(1) W.11-12.1.a Introduce precise, knowledgeable claim(s), establish the significance of the claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that logically sequences claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.
(1) W.11-12.1.b Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly and thoroughly, supplying the most relevant evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience's knowledge level, concerns, values, and possible biases.
(1) W.11-12.1.c Use words, phrases, and clauses as well as varied syntax to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.
(1) W.11-12.1.d Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.
(1) W.11-12.1.e Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented.
(1) W.11-12.10 Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.
(1) W.11-12.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.
(1) W.11-12.2.a Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information so that each new element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified whole; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
(1) W.11-12.2.b Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience's knowledge of the topic.
(1) W.11-12.3.c Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole and build toward a particular tone and outcome (e.g., a sense of mystery, suspense, growth, or resolution).
(1) W.11-12.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1-3 above.)
(1) W.11-12.5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.
(1) W.11-12.6 Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.
(1) W.11-12.7 Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
(1) W.11-12.8 Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation.
(1) W.11-12.9.b Apply grades 11-12 Reading standards to literary nonfiction (e.g., "Delineate and evaluate the reasoning in seminal U.S. texts, including the application of constitutional principles and use of legal reasoning [e.g., in U.S. Supreme Court Case majority opinions and dissents] and the premises, purposes, and arguments in works of public advocacy [e.g., The Federalist, presidential addresses]").
(1) WST.11-12.1 Write arguments focused on discipline-specific content.
(1) WST.11-12.1.b Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly and thoroughly, supplying the most relevant data and evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both claim(s) and counterclaims in a discipline-appropriate form that anticipates the audience's knowledge level, concerns, values, and possible biases.
(1) WST.11-12.10 Write routinely over extended time frames (time for reflection and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.
(1) WST.11-12.5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.
(1) WST.11-12.7 Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
(1) WST.11-12.8 Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the specific task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation.
(1) WST.11-12.9 Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

 What is synthesis?

 

What tactics may be used to synthesize documents?

 

How does synthesis of documents enhance a writer's argument?

 

What are the elements for writing a synthesis essay?

 

How can these elements be utilized in student responses?

Students will know the difference between primary and secondary sources.

 

Students will know how to read and analyze documents.

 

Students will know how to craft an argument/formulate a thesis.

 

Students will know how to use their argument to write a synthesis essay/research paper.

 

Students will know how to analyze historical documents and draw conclusions about the document.

 

Students will be able to interpret and use primary and secondary sources in their synthesized essay.

 

Students will be able to determine the writer's perspective(s), purpose(s) and intended audiences.

 

Students will be able to determine the reliability and significance of information.

 

Students will be able to write a synthesized essay/research paper.

 

Students will be able to analyze documents and draw conclusions. 

Activities:

NYLearns.org - Ain't That America

Song: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2gLIE5Xi9rA

NYLearns.org - Demonstrating an Understanding the Evolution of Democracy in the United States
NYLearns.org - The Constitution: Drafting a More Perfect Union
NYLearns.org - World War II Personalities

Articles:

http://www.wmd.org/about/current-challenges/current-challenges-democracy

http://www.time.com/time/nation/article/0,8599,2020667,00.html

Other Resources for Synthesis:

3 poems about America:
http://www.philosophicalsociety.com/Archives/Three%20Poems%20About%20America.htm

Poetry lesson Plan: comparing poetry- lesson plan.docx

The music of WW2:

1. "Der Fuehrer's Face"- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dZlFBSRrSR0

2. "Praise the Lord and Pass the Ammunition"- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LJfJPxLntZU

3. "Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy"- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qafnJ6mRbgk

Music lesson Plan: contrasting music- lesson plan.docx

Photos:

1. http://www.google.com/imgres?q=persuasive+art&biw=1024&bih=566&tbm=isch&tbnid=DZULMd-85GE8eM:&imgrefurl=http://wolfsonianfiulibrary.wordpress.com/2011/05/13/truth-and-propaganda/&docid=0ESod9yBD3SqxM&imgurl=http://wolfsonianfiulibrary.files.wordpress.com/2011/05/xc2003-03-7-14.jpg&w=628&h=800&ei=mXXMUeysGMev4APu1oGoAw&zoom=1&iact=hc&vpx=160&vpy=50&dur=2578&hovh=253&hovw=199&tx=104&ty=277&page=1&tbnh=134&tbnw=105&start=0&ndsp=18&ved=1t:429,r:7,s:0,i:107

 

2. http://www.google.com/imgres?q=political+cartoons&hl=en&biw=1024&bih=566&tbm=isch&tbnid=WLejq8tsMQcAdM:&imgrefurl=http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/fund-a-political-cartoonist-for-a-year&docid=BTlzPcLw3Y1oeM&imgurl=http://www.cagle.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/day-gun-control.jpg&w=640&h=448&ei=zIXRUayMOqG20gH52IGgAg&zoom=1&iact=hc&vpx=2&vpy=243&dur=1031&hovh=188&hovw=268&tx=123&ty=151&page=1&tbnh=134&tbnw=184&start=0&ndsp=16&ved=1t:429,r:5,s:0,i:103

3. http://www.google.com/imgres?q=political+cartoons&hl=en&biw=1024&bih=566&tbm=isch&tbnid=UkhejFyd3miPMM:&imgrefurl=http://politicalhumor.about.com/b/2012/11/26/political-cartoons-of-the-week-167.htm&docid=Fypwf_k-cAbvbM&imgurl=http://0.tqn.com/d/politicalhumor/1/0/5/w/4/save-the-twinkie.jpg&w=550&h=409&ei=zIXRUayMOqG20gH52IGgAg&zoom=1&iact=rc&dur=360&page=1&tbnh=135&tbnw=181&start=0&ndsp=16&ved=1t:429,r:2,s:0,i:94&tx=102&ty=89

4.http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.myconfinedspace.com/wp-content/uploads/tdomf/154644/joinordie.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.myconfinedspace.com/2010/07/13/join-or-die/joinordie-jpg/&usg=__ZPGpqZeLu4_NSpDPHZdqVfT-O5E=&h=957&w=1381&sz=191&hl=en&start=3&zoom=1&tbnid=BwK7RDxTuMA51M:&tbnh=140&tbnw=202&ei=r4fRUcKWKKjZ0QHhuYDgAQ&prev=/search%3Fq%3Dpolitical%2Bcartoons%26sa%3DX%26hl%3Den%26imgrefurl%3Dhttp://multimedialearningllc.wordpress.com/tag/political-cartoons/%26imgurl%3Dhttp://multimedialearningllc.files.wordpress.com/2010/08/snake-flag.jpg%26w%3D700%26h%3D492%26ndsp%3D20%26biw%3D1024%26bih%3D566%26tbs%3Dsimg:CAQSEgkG2Ss8_1kMUoiHO2AXlRs2Wkg%26tbm%3Disch&itbs=1&iact=rc&page=1&ved=1t:429,r:2,s:0,i:65&tx=85&ty=87

Go to Right Path to take 11/12 pre, mid, & post assessment.

 

1. Go to www.veaonline.org

2. Input username and password.

3. Go to "Lessons" on top bar.  Click on the drop box and click on "Assessment Search."

4. Look for: Pre-Assessment ID# 91591

    Look for:  Mid-Term Assessment ID# 91583

    Look for:  Final Assessment ID# 91587

 

Writing assessment #1:  Do question #1 from ap exam.docx

 

Writing assessment #2: 

Democracy is a particular type of goverenment, one that seems to be tied to the very spirit of America.  However, this government is also highly criticized for it's many failings.  Our democracy has evolved greatly since it's implementation in the 1776.

Carefully consider the sources you analyzed this marking period (from Instruction Resources).  From these sources, choose 3 and synthesize the information from these three sources and incorporate it into a coherent, well-developed essay that argues a clear position on whether democracy is the best form of government for America and or whether it should be restructured to meet the needs of our changing world. Make sure your argument is central; use the sources to illustrate and support your reasoning. Avoid merely summarizing the sources. Indicate clearly which sources you are drawing from, whether through direct quotation, paraphrase, or summary. Cite the sources.

 

 

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