Last updated: 4/9/2010
Niagara Falls City School District
630 66th Street, Niagara Falls, NY 14304


Science - Environmental Science - 10 Weeks

NOTE: All standards are correlated to the National Science Education Standards. As a result of their commencement level science courses, all students should develop an understanding of, and make informed decisions regarding the following scientific principles: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
Life Science: The interdependence of organisms (LS 4e) Human beings live within the world's ecosystems. Increasingly, humans modify ecosystems as a result of population growth, technology, and consumption. Human destruction of habitats through direct harvesting, pollution, atmospheric changes, and other factors is threatening current global stability, and if not addressed, ecosystems will be irreversibly affected. Section 1.1, p4-15

QuickLab- Classifying Resources, p14

Exploration Lab- What’s in an Ecosystem? p26-27

Reading Skill Builder- Brainstorming, p7; Reading Organizer, p7; Paired Reading, p9

Skill Builder: Math- p10; Writing- p11

Quiz, p. 15

Alternative Assessment p. 15
Science & Technology: understandings about science & technology (ST 2a) Scientists in different disciplines ask different questions, use different methods of investigation, and accept different types of evidence to support their explanations. Many scientific investigations require the contributions of individuals from different disciplines, including engineering. New disciplines of science, such as geophysics and biochemistry often emerge at the interface of two older disciplines. See above See above See above See above
Science in Personal & Social Perspectives: Natural resources (SPSP 3a) Human populations use resources in the environment in order to maintain and improve their existence. Natural resources have been and will continue to be used to maintain human populations. See above See above See above See above
Science in Personal & Social Perspectives: Science and technology in local, national, and global challenges (SPSP 6b) Understanding basic concepts and principles of science and technology should precede active debate about the economics, policies, politics, and ethics of various science- and technology-related challenges. However, understanding science alone will not resolve local, national, or global challenges.

Section 1.1, p4-15

Section 1.2, p16-21

Internet Activity- Ecological Footprints, p19

 

Field Activity- Critical Thinking and the News, p20

Cool School Challenge-Carbon Footprint

Reading Skill Builder- K-W-L, p17

Skill Builder: Writing- p17

Quiz, p21

Alternative Assessment p21
Science & Technology: Understandings about science and technology (ST 2c) Creativity, imagination, and a good knowledge base are all required in the work of science and engineering. Section 2.1, p30-37 QuickLab- Hypothesizing and Predicting, p32 Case Study- The Experimental Method in Action, p33

Quiz, p37

Alternative Assessment p37
Science in Personal and Social Perspectives: Science and technology in local, national, and global challenges (SPSP 6d) Individuals and society must decide on proposals involving new research and the introduction of new technologies into society. Decisions involve assessment of alternatives, risks, costs, and benefits and consideration of who benefits and who suffers, who pays and gains, and what the risks are and who bears them. Students should understand the appropriateness and value of basic questions--"What can happen?"--"What are the odds?"--and "How do scientists and engineers know what will happen?"

Section 2.1, p30-37

Section 2.2, p38-44

Section 2.3, p45-49

Group Activity- Modeling Lava Fractures, p42

Internet Activity- Acronym Glossary, p46
Using the Figure- Mercury Sources, p43

Quiz, p44

Alternative Assessment p44

Quiz, p49

Alternative Assessment p49
Life Science: Biological evolution (LS 3a) Species evolve over time. Evolution is the consequence of the interactions of (1) the potential for a species to increase its numbers, (2) the genetic variability of offspring due to mutation and recombination of genes, (3) a finite supply of the resources required for life, and (4) the ensuing selection by the environment of those offspring better able to survive and leave offspring.

Section 6.1, p 142-145

Section 6.2, p146-154

Section 6.3, p155-163

Activity- We’re All Thumbs! P149

 

Group Activity- Biome Components, p153

 

QuickLab- Sponging It Up, p158

 

Activity- Animal Adaptations to the Heat, p161

 

Activity-Tundra Creatures, p162

Deforestation Article
Using the Figure- Climatograms, p144 & 147

Case Study- Deforestation, Climate, and Floods, p150-151

Math Practice- U.S. Oil Production, p163

Quiz, p154

Alternative Assessment p154

Quiz, p163

Alternative Assessment p163
Life Science: Interdependence of organisms (LS 4c) Organisms both cooperate and compete in ecosystems. The interrelationships and interdependencies of these organisms may generate ecosystems that are stable for hundreds or thousands of years. See above See above
Biomes-UCMPBiomes-MBgnet
See above See above
Life Science: Interdependence of organisms(LS 4d) Living organisms have the capacity to produce populations of infinite size, but environments and resources are finite. This fundamental tension has profound effects on the interactions between organisms. See above See above See above See above
Life Science: Behavior of organisms (LS 6b) Organisms have behavioral responses to internal changes and to external stimuli. Responses to external stimuli can result from interactions with the organism's own species and others, as well as environmental changes; these responses either can be innate or learned. The broad patterns of behavior exhibited by animals have evolved to ensure reproductive success. Animals often live in unpredictable environments, and so their behavior must be flexible enough to deal with uncertainty and change. Plants also respond to stimuli. See above See above See above See above
Life Science: Interdependence of organisms(LS 4e) Living organisms have the capacity to produce populations of infinite size, but environments and resources are finite. This fundamental tension has profound effects on the interactions between organisms.

Section 7.1, p172-178

Section 7.2, p179-185

Internet Activity- Wetland Plants, p176

Group Activity- Marine Exosystmes, p184

Student Opportunities-Wetland Nurseries, p176

MathPractice- Wetland Conversion, p177

Map Skills- Aquatic Diversity

Quiz, p178

Alternative Assessment p178

Quiz, p185

Alternative Assessment p185
Science in Personal and Social Perspective: Natural resources (SPSP 3c) Science and technology in local, national, and global challenges See above See above
EPA-WetlandsEPA-

Wetlands Video Clip
See above See above
Science in Personal and Social Perspective: Environmental quality (SPSP 4a) Natural ecosystems provide an array of basic processes that affect humans. Those processes include maintenance of the quality of the atmosphere, generation of soils, control of the hydrologic cycle, disposal of wastes, and recycling of nutrients. Humans are changing many of these basic processes, and the changes may be detrimental to humans. See above See above See above See above
Science in Personal and Social Perspective: Natural and human-induced hazards (SPSP 5b) Human activities can enhance potential for hazards. Acquisition of resources, urban growth, and waste disposal can accelerate rates of natural change. See above See above See above See above
Science in Personal and Social Perspective: Science and technology in local, national, and global challenges (SPSP6e) Humans have a major effect on other species. For example, the influence of humans on other organisms occurs through land use--which decreases space available to other species--and pollution--which changes the chemical composition of air, soil, and water. See above See above See above See above
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